Medical Observerships

Medical Observerships

Dana Hornbeak


What can the rest of us learn when a top American scholar visits the Armenian EyeCare Project? Plenty! Dana Hornbeak is a medical student specializing in ophthalmology who volunteered to spend time in Armenia. The attached story describes what she saw as an official Medical Observer. Written by Hornbeak herself, it details many of the dramas and medical miracles she’s witnessed on a daily basis through her work with the Armenian EyeCare Project.

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Eye Safety Playing Sports


A few sports injury prevention steps can help keep everyone in the game. All eye protection should fit securely and have cushions above your eyebrows and over your nose. Face masks, polycarbonate guards or shields that attach to a helmet are worn in sports such as football, ice hockey, and softball and baseball when batting. Goggles are often worn for soccer, basketball, racquet sports, snowboarding, street hockey, and baseball and softball when fielding. If you wear glasses, you’ll probably need prescription polycarbonate goggles — don’t just wear your regular glasses when you’re on the court or field.

Stevie Wonder


Born prematurely on May 13, 1950, in Saginaw, Michigan, Stevie Wonder was blinded by ROP at a time in the U.S. when doctors didn’t yet know and understand the diagnosis and treatment for this horrific disease — one that left thousands of American children blind in the 1950s. A singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Wonder made his musical debut at age 12 and recorded his first hit single in 1963. Over the next decade, Wonder recorded several hit songs, including “Living in the City,” “Boogie on a Reggae Woman” and “Isn’t She Lovely.” His fertile period came to an end in 1979. Wonder’s ‘80s hits include “I Just Called to Say I Love You” and “Ebony and Ivory.” He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989.

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Diabetic Eye Disease


Diabetic retinopathy, or diabetic eye disease, is a complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness. It occurs when diabetes damages the tiny blood vessels inside the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. A healthy retina is necessary for good vision. If you have diabetic retinopathy, at first you may notice no changes to your vision. But over time, the condition can worsen and cause vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy usually affects both eyes.

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Where We Work


armenia