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Eye Disease

Arshaluis’s Story

Arshaluis Nerkarayan was just one month old when his parents, Gayaneh Matevosyan and Arthur Nerkararyan, were told that he had a congenital cataract in both eyes and could not see. Gayaneh and Arthur immediately decided that they would do everything in their power to help their son lead a normal life.

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Globally,
UNCORRECTED REFRACTIVE ERRORS
are the main cause of moderate and severe visual impairment.

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Myth: It is okay to swim while wearing soft contact lenses.

Fact: No, it is not okay to swim while wearing contact lenses. Serious or potentially blinding eye infections can result from swimming or even using a hot tub while wearing contact lenses.

Myth: An eye examination is necessary only if you are having eye problems.

Fact: Everyone should follow proper eye care, including regular eye exams, whether or not you're having any noticeable signs of problems. Children should be tested at birth, at 6 months of age, before entering school and periodically throughout school years.

Myth: Safety goggles are more trouble than they are worth.

Fact: Using safety goggles prevents many eye injuries – injuries that can potentially blind you or damage your eyes.
Keep safety goggles handy and use them.

Lilit Mkrtchyan, M.D.

Born into a family of physicians, Mkrtchyan describes herself as a hereditary doctor. Her father, Gevorg, is an abdominal surgeon, mother, Ivetta, is an ophthalmologist, and older sister, Nune, is a pediatrician.

“I grew up in an atmosphere of concern for patients, discussing treatment and medical issues [with my family],” she says. “My decision to become a doctor, I think, was a logical and emotional outcome of these circumstances.”

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2010 – Blindness by gender:
55% Female, 34% Male

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Cataracts

As the population begins to age and life expectancy increases, it is imperative that Armenia address cataract surgical coverage. Today, approximately 91,000 Armenians — or 30 percent of the population — aged 65 and over have cataracts in one or both eyes, causing partial or complete blindness. By 2050, that number will more than double – leading to roughly 221,200 Armenians affected. Because cataract surgery is so limited in Armenia – just 24 percent coverage – most people (the remaining 76 percent) go without care, leaving thousands visually disabled. In the United States people accept cataract surgery as a part of aging and is a very common procedure. Sadly, in Armenia, many people accept blindness as a part of growing older because they have no access to cataract surgery.

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